Wybourn Hotel, Sheffield

Pub to make way for a car wash:

Its been a quiet few months in demolition terms, which is good news for Yorkshire’s built heritage.

Sadly this month sees a charming pub in Sheffield up for the chop to make way for a concrete hardstanding that would be a car wash.

This pub is just down the road from the iconic Park Hill, which is now a thriving residence of bright young things. But they don’t seem to go to the pub. To my knowledge, there is no other drinkery for miles. The thousands of houses in Wybourne will no longer have a local.

The Council could resist this, as it would be a change of use and intensify the vehicle egress onto the highway. At that point im sure a number of uses would come forward that would result in the retention of the building. And in years to come maybe the residents of Park Hill will decide to be more sociable.

Victorian Terrace, Birstall

Adandonned Victorian terrace in Birstall:

www.kirklees.gov.uk/beta/planning-applications/search-for-planning-applications/detail.aspx?id=2022/92081

A very modest terrace of four dwellings, two stories to the front, three to the rear. Classic Victorian housing stock that could have lasted forever if looked after.

The image above doesn’t show any building of architectural merit, but it is the short stone terraced rows like this that make west yorkshire special. They will be replaced with an undisclosed supermarket. Aldi or Lidl I expect.

Minus 4 units for Kirklees’ housing target then.

Nelson Inn, Thornhill Lees, Dewsbury

Pub in South Dewsbury demolished: www.kirklees.gov.uk/beta/planning-applications/search-for-planning-applications/detail.aspx?id=2022/92094

The Nelson Inn, having been closed for around a year has been demolished unlawfully by accounts from the local residents. This is strange, as the propsed plans do not show any alterations to the building, just its conversion to an Islamic learning centre and prayer room.

The applicant states that they will rebuild like for like, but I anticipate a few minor amendments coming in, or even an alternative scheme one the the principle of development is approved.

I cant think why any religeous institution would wish to invest in a building that resembles a Victorian pub. I’ll be keeping my eye on this one.

Woodman Inn, Todmorden

Long since derelict pub to be dropped for 6 houses near Todmorden, Calderdale:

Looking back through Google Street View, this pub hasn’t been in use for a very long time. And it’s clear why. The area lost its mill, and much of the housing around this area has been demolished, as can be seen from the historic map below from circa 1900.

Planning permission for its conservation into flats was refused back in 2009, which would have been a much better option, but alas it is in Green Belt. Going even further back, in 2000 the conversion was approved. Frustrating planning inconsistency.

This fantastic website (www.halifaxpeople.com) has some interesting old images of the pub in a more prosperous time, in which it was part of a nascent village. It would seem the neighboring terraces were demolished to allow for the pub car park. It also looks like the tall chimneys have been removed. Sad to see not just the pub go, but a mill and it’s contingent community over a protracted century of decline.

Thanks to Halifaxpeople.com
*I have used images from their site for not profitable purposes

The Bird In Hand, Garforth

Estate pub to be pulled down for housing:

This 20th-century pub lies at the heart of a housing estate, and was envisaged as a hub in this suburban extension to Garforth. Its not a particulary historic pub, or of any architectural merit, but nonetheless, the monotony of cul-de-sacs and dormer bungalows benefits from a public building tieing everything together.

And it’s always worth a moment to lament when an English pub is erased to make way for some drab housing.

Red House Pub, Bradford

Another pub to be removed from Bradford:

Not the prettiest of drinkeries, but it’s what’s inside that counts. And under that pebbledash exterior is a beautiful masonry end-terrace. Bradford loses a pub a month, and in my opinion each one worth lamenting. A tiny bit more of the Victorian city lost forever.

Some of the original stonework remains exposed at the base of the building

Butlers Farm, Finningley

Farm buildings and paddock to be lost for the development of 5 dwellings near Doncaster:

A charming farming house and single-story courtyard stable block are to be demolished and replaced with a small cul-de-sac. The farmhouse has been left empty for some years and is supposedly beyond repair (as the comments of the Civic Society would suggest). I’m not convinced. I would rather see the farmhouse divided into two dwellings, the stables converted into two-story mews dwellings, and a further dwelling adjacent ot the road. That would be how a farm would naturally densify, and would offer the same 5 new dwellings in an organic way.

Finningley is/was a quintessential village, with a green, pubs, and a few clusters of farm buildings. Its a shame to lose some of this original fabric. Maybe we need to start letting those with some extra land develop it themselves, slowly, dwelling by dwelling, rather than leaning on the usual housebuilders to acquire farmland and develop it in this generic way.

Railway Inn, Irlam, Salford

Beautiful pub to be demolished for 10 flats:

A quiet month in Yorkshire on the demolition front has allowed me to explore the other side of the Pennines this month, beginning in Salford; a Local Authority that seems to have a penchant for erasing its history, whilst being beguiled by a vague notion of regeneration.

This lovely High Street pub has been closed since 2016, and was due to be converted into a daycare center, preserving the building.

Sold via auction for £200k in 2019, the new owner sought a higher return and put in an application for a three-story building, which was rightly refused.

The new application shows a similar-sized building albeit with a pitched roof, but equally dominant in the otherwise domestic scale street.

The building has been described as derelict and vandalised, which is seemingly how all buildings are described after being momentarily vacant in developer rhetoric.

The pub offers an important contribution to this street, which is one of the few remaining high streets of the towns in Greater Manchester that remains entirely Victorian/Edwardian.

As the building has recently been shown to be viable for business use, Salford should recognise the value in its retention. This is a high street, and a commercial use should be favoured over residential flats.

Victorian Coach House, Sheffield

Demolition of a Victorian coach house in East Sheffield:

Now I accept this isn’t a big deal. It’s a modest garage for a wealthy Victorian family, from a period when this part of the city was the reserve of the monied mercantile class of the city.

But I’ve walked down this street, and somehow this building really does anchor its character. One end of the street is a multistory carpark vision of post-modern Sheffield. But this end is stone and slate.

Hopefully, something of high quality will replace it, rather than four parking spaces for the adjacent doctors’ surgery.

Map circa 1900

Silver Fox pub, Stocksbridge

Pub in South Yorkshire to be demolished for 12 houses:

This pub has been up for sale for £225,000, which is a steal considering its also a very large handsome house. Even if you lived upstairs and had your own personal pub downstairs, you’d still be getting a home far bigger than anything else for that money nearby. Maybe the marketing didn’t quite reach a big enough audience.

I can see that delivering 12 houses will appeal to some, but as ever I contend that houses can be delivered on this site whilst retaining the building. Its only been closed since 2019, which is not enough time to demonstrate a cultural shift in Stocksbridge away from pub-going. The people around here clearly still need a boozer! I count 2 remaining pubs in Stocksbridge. This is a town of 10,000 people.

It’s not the most quaint pub, set in an overly large concrete car park (could have been your front garden…) in a housing estate. The historic maps show the pub to be on the site on an earlier property called Half Hall, however, the current building dates from 1963 – relatively modern in spite of its appearance alluding to early 19th-century pub architecture.