East Ardsley Methodist Church

Small Methodist church to be demolished in the centre of East Ardsley:

https://publicaccess.leeds.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=map&keyVal=OM6E70JBFML00

East Ardsley Methodist church.JPG

 

A village already stripped bare of much of its history, particularly along the high street, the purge will continue with the loss of this modest but vital Methodist church.

It is not about the merits of the individual building, but what the building embodies – clearly not much capital was available from the Wesleyans, but nonetheless the built a temple in this small industrial village.

The built form that constitutes the centre of a settlement is so vital to a sense of place. We can not judge buildings by their individual merit, but by what they contribute to the overall street form. Planning mechanisms that protect this are scarce and seldom called upon.

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The Golden Lion, Armley

Derelict pub in Armley Conservation area:

https://publicaccess.leeds.gov.uk/online-applications/simpleSearchResults.do?action=firstPage

 

Not much of the old Armley left sadly, and it looks like another piece of the past will be lost as light industry expands in this part of deprived Leeds. The gentrification of Armley that was widely predicted never really happened, leaving the old stock under appreciated. A few hundred hipsters could have kept these doors open I’m sure. Gentrification can help in small doses

Former Crimea Tavern, Castleford

Former Crimea Tavern pub in Castleford to be demolished for flats:

https://planning.wakefield.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=map&keyVal=OIH260QQFUG00

 

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Once more, the loss of a derelict pub is justified by a supposed lack of architectural merit. Conservation officers at Wakefield would not have any grounding to justify an intervention in this case. Even if they wanted to.

This is sad. We need to recognise that it is not just the architectural treatment of the elevation, or the quality of the architectural vocabulary that make a building important.

It is the massing, its relationship with the street, and the proportionality of the elevation that are of historic value – characteristics which are not acknowledged in any replacement. This is clearly stated in every policy going; national, district, local.

Thus another pocket of Yorkshire loses its final piece of a once populated high street.

 

 

Norwood Green Mill, Halifax

Mill building to be demolished in small Calderdale hill village:

https://portal.calderdale.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=summary&keyVal=OHIC8LDWKAQ00

 

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Very important piece of heritage for this small village on top of the moors to the East of Halifax.

From an urban design perspective, the building is vital to the village centre, providing a strong building line on the edge of the village green feature.

From a conservation point of view, village mills like this are fascinating, because they are often the sole example of heavy industry in the settlement, providing an economic base for the rest of the village to thrive.

The buildings are all robust and are in use, and could achieve a fantastic market value. Sadly, for some unknown reason, the market is signalling for more semi detached dull stock fit for new families in the countryside.

There is an irony in despoiling the beauty and history of villages, on which elevated market desirability for these semis is predicated.

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Woodman Inn, Hebden Bridge

Application to demolish the long abandoned Woodman Inn pub at Charlestown just outside Hebden Bridge:

https://portal.calderdale.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=summary&keyVal=OEIP6EDWJ2400

woodman inn.JPG

This pub has now been in a state of dereliction for at least 10 years. Standing on the road to the Moors, when the culture of drinking and driving (rightly) met its demise this location would have proven to be logistically awkward.

Still, with the cultural draw of Hebden Bridge but a mile away, I’m sure a skilled publican could have reanimated The Woodman Inn. Other pubs of this disposition have thrived.

 

Star and Garter in Sheffield

The Star and Garter in Sheffield is to be replaced with student accommodation:

https://planningapps.sheffield.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=summary&keyVal=OCH39CNYLEK00

star-and-garter-sheffield

It is a charming corner pub just across from the university. Are students not drinking anymore? Suppose there isn’t much beer money left after tuition fees. Someone ironically across the road from the planning department I may add….

 

 

Former Methodist School, Farnley

Demolition of former snooker club, Farnley

https://publicaccess.leeds.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=summary&keyVal=O9U6KIJBKWP00

Leeds snooker club.JPG

Quite a nice building that provides some nice high street active frontage. Not historical in the sense of The Royal Cresent or Saltaire, this building was erected in 1905 as a Methodist School and plays a part in the history of Leeds, which is a relatively modern city.

Maybe not the greatest loss, but my worry is that it will be replaced with a design that does not contribute to an active streetscape. Old building are very good at this.